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10. Lateral ejection of thousands of individual 4 - 20 ton steel beams up to 500 feet

It has been argued that the force of each floor falling on to the other was still enough to nudge the perimeter columns outward. And since they had a long way to fall, they reached quite a distance.

I believe the idea that the floors pancaked to begin with has no real evidence. Nevertheless, for the sake of argument, let's assume for a second that they did indeed do so; I have seen no evidence that 'the force of each floor falling on to the other was still enough to nudge the perimeter columns outward' And as to the 'nudge' part; 500 feet does not seem like a nudge. What's more, the debris was being ejected just as strongly right from the beginning, when the length of the fall was still relatively small.

The argument has also been made that demolition experts will tell you that their materials do local damage to each beam it is placed on, slicing it like butter. Far from being capable of throwing tons of steel great distances. However, normal demolition experts don't have access to nanothermite, which is capable of packing quite an impressive punch, especially when it comes to iron based metals.

In post 32, KennyJC argues that "[the] fact that some debris did fall off to the side is due to the fact that tower was not falling at free fall speed."

But the wasn't just 'falling off', it was exploding outwards.

KennyJC further argues that "if the tower was collapsing at free fall speed, all the debris would have gone straight down. But from watching the collapse, you see loose columns at the top being held up by the slow collapse, and following the path of least resistance fell off to the side and it’s momentum continued in an outward direction. As it fell near 1,000, the drift carried it to other buildings."

If by 'drift' he meant pyroclastic flow, I agree :-).

He also argues that my last statement, "normal demolition experts don't have access to nanothermite, which is capable of packing quite an impressive punch, especially when it comes to iron based metals", made him laugh. He asks me "how... do you know what nanothermite can do compared to conventional explosions?"

The answer is research.

He also asks "even if this mystical substance does do as you say, where are the ear piercing explosions?"

Thermate is far from mythical. I think I remember hearing somewhere that nanothermite may not make so much noise, but I haven't been able to find that information again, if I did in the past. Another possibility is that more explosives were used and thus, instead of a few sharp blasts, you had many smaller ones, which could be confused as the simple rumble of a building collapsing.